instagram envelope_alt facebook twitter search youtube_play whatsapp remove external_link loop2 arrow-down2

Prince of Wales: ‘All humanity can and must learn lessons of Holocaust’

Remembrance:
Charles lays a wreath
at the event in Israel
marking 75 years
since the liberation
of Auschwitz PICTURE: AFP/GETTY

THE Prince of Wales urged nations to ‘learn the lessons’ of the Holocaust as he joined world leaders in condemning anti-Semitism.

At an event marking 75 years since the liberation of Auschwitz, Charles described the extermination of 6million Jewish people during World War II as a ‘universal human tragedy’ that affected everyone — not just the families of those killed by the Nazi regime.

Face-to-face: The prince with French president Emmanuel Macron PICTURE: GETTY

The heir to the throne spoke during the World Holocaust Forum in Israel and told guests — including Russian president Vladimir Putin and French leader Emmanuel Macron — that the story of ‘incomprehensible humanity’ must not be forgotten.

He also warned that ‘hatred and intolerance still lurk in the human heart’ but society must remain ‘resolute in resisting words and acts of violence’.

Speaking at Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Centre in Jerusalem, Charles said stories of the Holocaust belonged to many of those in the audience and Jewish people across the globe.

But he added it was ‘a story of incomprehensible inhumanity, from which all humanity can and must learn’. German president Frank- Walter Steinmeier said his nation had ‘a heavy historical burden of guilt’.

Charles also paid tribute to the ‘selfless actions’ of his grandmother, Princess Alice, who, in 1943 while living in Nazi-occupied Greece, sheltered a Jewish family in her home.

In 1993, Yad Vashem bestowed the title of Righteous Among The Nations on her and she is buried at the nearby Mount of Olives. Charles said it gave him ‘immense pride’.Meanwhile, Clarence House denied claims Charles had snubbed US vice president Mike Pence, saying they had enjoyed a ‘warm chat’ before they entered the room.