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Murder file is ‘still open’ on Kenneth Noye witness shot in his car

Unsolved hit: Alan
Decabral was killed
just months after
giving evidence at
Kenneth Noye’s trial
PICTURE: MIKE GUNNILL

THE murder of a witness who was shot dead after helping put road rage killer Kenneth Noye behind bars is still being investigated, police have said.

Alan Decabral was gunned down in 2000, just months after giving evidence at the trial of notorious gangster Noye.

Despite a hunt for his killer by Kent Police, no one has ever been convicted.

M25 killer: Kenneth Noye is due to be freed from jail PICTURE: PA

The force confirmed a file on the unsolved crime ‘remains open’ — just a week after it emerged Noye, now 72, will be released from prison following a parole review board found he no longer posed a risk to the public.

Noye, who stabbed electrician Stephen Cameron, 21, to death in an argument on the M25 in 1996, was questioned over the killing of Mr Decabral but never charged.

Noye knifed Mr Cameron in front of his girlfriend with a 9in blade. He fled to Spain as a fugitive until his extradition in 1999.

Road rage victim: Stephen Cameron, 21, was knifed to death by Kenneth Noye on a motorway slip road in 1996 PICTURE: SWNS

At his trial in April 2000, witness Mr Decabral told the Old Bailey jury he had seen two men fighting on the Swanley slip road and saw Noye ‘lunging forward’ with a knife to stab Mr Cameron.

Six months later, the father-of-three was sitting in his car in Ashford, Kent, when a man shot him through the open window. Witnesses described hearing him beg for his life during the ‘professional hit’ on October 5.

Noye has always maintained Mr Decabral had a ‘motive to lie’ as a bargaining tool with police. He was revealed by police as a career criminal with links to drugs and guns.

A force spokesman said this week: ‘To date, there have been no charges in relation to his death. The file on this case remains open and, as with all unsolved major crimes, Kent Police regularly review cases.’